Busy once more trying to finalize the Security Track for LinuxWorld San Francisco. Will be hard to top some of the speakers from last year, but I’ve got some very interesting topics this year. I just always forget how hard it is to coordinate all the different speakers’ times and communication.

Last year I actually missed out on attending LinuxWorld as I was on baby watch (the little one was due any day around that time), but looking forward to making it this year!

Just ran across this interesting news bit:

“Verizon Wireless Says ‘Bring Your Own’ Device”

Very interesting, but after reading it, all it really sounds like is a slightly refined version of what GSM networks are all about. I have for the past 3 years brought my own device (in my case an Unlocked Treo) to AT&Ts network. I bought phone and data plans independent of the device (which admittedly kinda stretches the boundaries of some of AT&Ts policy, they have an idea of what plans I should have, which is different from what I think I need and have).

It will be interesting to find out what the eventual details will be, is it just going to be a SIM card for CDMA networks? Or will it be something more?

Have to wait and see I guess.

I run several servers, all of which run linux, OpenSSH, and Apache HTTPD. Some run VSftpd as well (legacy requirements). They all are attacked by brute force hacking attempts daily, yes daily. Every day I go through my logs and see the 10’s of thousands of attempted break in attacks. It’s annoying, it tends to make the log files very long to look through. Even my parsed and abstracted log reports are forced into long lists of attacking IP addresses and attempted usernames. Here is an example from just today on ONE server:

Failed SSH logins: 2971

Failed FTP logins: 18,415

Faild SMTP logins: 1656

And this is not a server hosting super popular websites or mirrors. This is just a no name server hosting a couple of websites. In the past I used to contact the owners of the IP addresses these came from, but it became tedious and difficult. They’re often internet providers dynamic IPs of clients, which the ISP tends to not care they are attacking my server (most likely, they are trojaned anyways).

All these attempted attacks do is waste resources. They waste my bandwidth, processing, and storage (the log files).

Just me deciding to put into writing one of my daily annoyances.

Well, I decided about a month ago that the old Treo 650 was getting old and needed a little refresh, I generally keep my PDAs for about 3 years before upgrading, and that’s about how long it’s been. Unfortunately, there wasn’t really anything compelling to upgrade to. None of the new Treo’s out provide much improvement over my current 650 on GSM networks. The iPhone is cool and all, but the lack of third party apps and no 3G network, really doesn’t make it a compelling upgrade to my old 650 (I can do already do just about everything the iPhone can do, just not in as cool a way). With no sight of the Linux based palms and a 3G iPhone or Blackberry, wasn’t sure what to do.

Well, decided for now I’d just do a minor upgrade when I found a real good deal on a used but practically new Treo 680. It gives me a slightly smaller and lighter form factor, no antenna stub, more onboard ram, and better bluetooth than the Treo 650. Minor improvements, but enough hopefully to hold out till Palm, Apple, or Blackberry put out something compelling.

Oh and for the record, I’m not very impressed with any of the Windows or Symbian based smartphones out currently. The few Symbian phones that look cool are only available overseas and lack the US frequencies I need.

So I have a little more breathing room to wait for the smartphone of my dreams, and keep dreaming…

I added the Fedora 7 install page to the collection. There wasn’t that much to it, I just added some tweaks from previous write ups and new things I’ve found. The base install works perfectly fine, but I like these changes which seem to make the laptop a little more affective. I still wish I could figure out why you have to suspend to ram at least once before the screen brightness keys work and the mode selector will work.

You can find it here.

Well, I finally got MythTV all setup and running how I would like. Thanks in part to the work of Jarod Wilson’s Fedora Myth(tv)ology and the MythTV.org Wiki I’ve installed all the software and configured everything to work with my hardware. I’ve also converted over to the new TV listings supply from Schedules Direct since Zap2It labs is closing the end of this month.

Here are the specs of my MythTV Box:

  • Fedora Core 6 (may migrate to CentOS 5)
  • AMD Athlon 64 x2 3800 CPU
  • 2 GB DDR Ram (512MB x 4)
  • 2x Seagate 400GB SATA 300 HD in Raid 1 (will migrate to Raid 0 soon)
  • nVidia 6150 Chipset motherboard with built in HD scaling component video out
  • MCE USB IR sensor
  • Hauppauge PVR-500 Dual Analog Tuner (NTSC)
  • Silicondust HDHomeRun Dual High Definition Tuner (ATSC/QAM)
  • NMediaPC HTPC 200 Case
  • Logitech Harmony 880 Remote (makes it all easy to run).

LiveTV and programmed listing recording works perfectly. I have about 360GB of space dedicated to Media storage. I’ve found that even Analog TV takes a lot of storage space (about 1GB per 30 minutes) to get good quality video that scales well to the 1920x1080i resolution I’m running on my HD TV. I’ll probably play with the analog recording settings more to try and find the optimal quality to still create nice images, but right now the picture of analog TV looks better through MythTV than it does with the TV’s built in Analog tuners. My only complaint is fast action shots show a little tearing/pixeling, but that’s more an artifact of 1080i than the MythTV. Wish the TV accepted 1080p or even 720p, but it’s an older Toshiba CRT HDTV that only does 1080i, 480p, and 480i. Still, the picture is beautiful!

Well, today is a good day not to live or work in Germany if you make your living with technology.  Today Germany officially makes it illegal to use or develop security tools which could at all be used as “hacking tools” regardless of actual use or intent.  That means you can’t create or use a tool to scan your own network for errors in security that you made.  So you’ll just have to wait until some Black Hat hacker breaks into your network to learn of your mistakes.  Man is this a stupid law..

Germany enacts “anti-hacker” law

Well, LinuxWorld San Francisco Expo and Conference wrapped up this week. I was the Security Track Chair (Part of the Program Committee) and hope that people found the talks helpful and full of quality tech info. Unfortunately I missed out on attending this year, as I’m currently on baby watch (waiting for our first child to make his debut into the world). Looking forward to getting some feedback and finding out how things went.

LinuxWorld Expo San Francisco 2007

Excellent news for the Linux community, Judge Dale Kimball ruled late yesterday that SCO does not own the Unix and Unixware copyrights, that in fact Novell owns the copyright. This seriously guts SCO’s lawsuits with IBM, RedHat, AutoZone, and the Linux world in general. After having failed to provide any examples of code in Linux that infringed, then changing their case to a contract dispute with IBM over copyright, they have now been told they don’t even own that copyright. Doesn’t look good for SCO, hopefully this is the end of their FUD (why do I doubt that 🙁 ).

Judge rules Novell owns Unix copyrights.

Wrote another article about Grids.  This one is about migrating from WS-RF to WS-RT.  It covers some of the general issues and components of each standard you’ll have to focus on and provides links to more detailed information for implementing your solution.  I had some experience with WS-RF and this article helped me learn more about WS-RT myself.  Hope it help others as well!

Migrating from WSRF to WSRT 

« Previous PageNext Page »

Copyright © 2015 · All Rights Reserved · Cafaro's Ramblings